Girls Like Us – Review

By Kelsey Saragnese

I don’t usually enjoy memoirs and autobiographies because, by their very nature, they are very focused on themselves, without a picture of the story and circumstances surrounding the author. However, Rachel Lloyd’s memoir, Girls Like Us, is an anti-memoir, a book about a movement, in which she includes herself only because it is necessary to get a better grasp on the shared experiences of hundreds of thousands of girls, as the title suggests, like her.

Rachel’s story mirrors the one she tells of GEMS (Girls Educational & Mentoring Services): chapters filled with GEMS girls you meet, and are automatically drawn to, interspersed with her own addiction, abuse, exploitation, and recovery. Rachel illustrates the details of her own past, elaborate, haunting accounts that let a reader like myself, who has never experienced most of the things she has, understand and envision the horrors that trafficked and exploited girls face every day.

This is a book that I would suggest to anyone. Every woman should read it to understand that women, simply because they are women, are targeted and abused by predatory men, but that there are ways to stop it, to stand up for their unknown sisters and daughters. Every man should read it to understand the ramifications of actions, of jokes, of being a bystander, of tolerating that which cannot be tolerated. 

Girls Like Us is available from the Central Missouri Stop Human Trafficking Coalition for $20. To purchase a copy, email help@stophumantraffickingmo.com.

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